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TOPIC: Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino?

Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89000

The first time I went to Singapore many years ago, I wasn't very happy; I didn't enjoy the place because it was raining all the time, and having lived in Thailand for a long time then, I wasn't prepared for that kind of weather. Nor did I appreciate the way I was treated at the shops then. I was thinking, is it just the culture i wasn't used to, or was there something wrong with me to deserve such bad treatment. I mean, after all, there I was, THE CUSTOMER.

Later I realized, that most Filipinos in Singapore at that time, were working as domestic helpers. And as we all know, domestic helpers are not treated very well by people who hail from other work or career paths.

It didn't help, nor did I have the chance to say to those naive shop owners then, that many, if not all, of those domestic helpers they looked down upon, were College degree holders. I also did not have any chance to tell them how much sacrifice it took for those domestic helpers to leave children, husbands, relatives, fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers and friends, in order to work abroad. It wasn't that there was no work at all available back home. There is work, but salaries were meager, the benefits nonexistent.

Two weeks ago, I went to Singapore with Master J and the kids. Since my first trip, I have been back to Singapore a number of times, but it was only this recent trip with the family that I have come to appreciate the country and the people, for what it has become over the years.

In Singapore today, many Filipinos work in many different fields: I have a friend who works as an accountant there, a cousin who works as a nurse, a distant aunt who works as a domestic helper, and many more 'kababayans' who work as engineers, in the IT field, and others.

In fact, I would dare say that Tagalog is now the fifth language in Singapore, with English, Chinese, Malay and Indian language being the first four. I mean, there was a staff at the food center we ate at who says "salamat" when we paid for our food, and my cousin says staff at the shops nowadays would be so bold enough to say "kuripot" (so when you go visit, make sure you don't bargain too much!)

And when you walk along Orchard road, it seemed like every fifth person we bumped into was speaking a Filipino dialect; Ilonggo, Tagalog, Bisaya, Bicolano, you name it! It was like walking the streets of Manila, the only difference being the streets are cleaner, and everyone follows rules! :lol:

And so, in this instance, I don't hate being Filipino. In fact, whenever we were asked where we were from, we would say proudly, "Philippines"!
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89003

Madam H wrote:
The first time I went to Singapore many years ago, I wasn't very happy; I didn't enjoy the place because it was raining all the time, and having lived in Thailand for a long time then, I wasn't prepared for that kind of weather. Nor did I appreciate the way I was treated at the shops then. I was thinking, is it just the culture i wasn't used to, or was there something wrong with me to deserve such bad treatment. I mean, after all, there I was, THE CUSTOMER.

Later I realized, that most Filipinos in Singapore at that time, were working as domestic helpers. And as we all know, domestic helpers are not treated very well by people who hail from other work or career paths.

It didn't help, nor did I have the chance to say to those naive shop owners then, that many, if not all, of those domestic helpers they looked down upon, were College degree holders. I also did not have any chance to tell them how much sacrifice it took for those domestic helpers to leave children, husbands, relatives, fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers and friends, in order to work abroad. It wasn't that there was no work at all available back home. There is work, but salaries were meager, the benefits nonexistent.

Two weeks ago, I went to Singapore with Master J and the kids. Since my first trip, I have been back to Singapore a number of times, but it was only this recent trip with the family that I have come to appreciate the country and the people, for what it has become over the years.

In Singapore today, many Filipinos work in many different fields: I have a friend who works as an accountant there, a cousin who works as a nurse, a distant aunt who works as a domestic helper, and many more 'kababayans' who work as engineers, in the IT field, and others.

In fact, I would dare say that Tagalog is now the fifth language in Singapore, with English, Chinese, Malay and Indian language being the first four. I mean, there was a staff at the food center we ate at who says "salamat" when we paid for our food, and my cousin says staff at the shops nowadays would be so bold enough to say "kuripot" (so when you go visit, make sure you don't bargain too much!)

And when you walk along Orchard road, it seemed like every fifth person we bumped into was speaking a Filipino dialect; Ilonggo, Tagalog, Bisaya, Bicolano, you name it! It was like walking the streets of Manila, the only difference being the streets are cleaner, and everyone follows rules! :lol:

And so, in this instance, I don't hate being Filipino. In fact, whenever we were asked where we were from, we would say proudly, "Philippines"!

Nice thoughts, Madam H... I was feeling the same sentiments when I went to South Korea because there, most Filipinas are wokring as GROs/prostitutes and factory workers. They looked down Filipinos who are living there and have bad impressions, although you did nothing wrong to them. You're lucky if you will be able to belong in their circle because that's the way they treat Filipinos... an outcast. Good thing, I've proven them wrong as I've gained so many Korean friends from all ages there in the neighborhood :lol:

Whenever, I hear bad news about my fellow Filipinos.. I feel bad :( and whenever I hear news about Filipinos doing illegal jobs or things I feel very bad as well, But at the same time there is this feeling that "I wish I was not a Filipino... because it sucks!" Do you feel happy if you will be branded as gold digger, prostitute, thief and slave? just because you are a Filipino? Other nationalities tend to look down on us because there are some Filipinos who are doing bad or illegal things and no matter how good we are. We cannot tell them not to generalize us, Filipinos but we can prove to them that we are different as individuals by doing good and positive things despite of everything.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

People are often unreasonable, illogical,
and self-centered;
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you
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Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some
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What you spend years building, someone
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(Mother Theresa had this on her wall.)

________________________________________________________________________________________

I am proud to be a Filipino if there's someone like Manny Pacquiao who gives honor and pride to our country...
;) :)
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89004

For the more than ten years that I have been working in international schools in Thailand, I hated the fact that I didn't have the guts to encourage my farang and fellow Asian co-workers to go visit our country. Why so? Well, how do I start listing all the reasons...

For one, I don't know much about our geography, and let's face it, it is only in recent years, that many spots worthy for tourists to visit, have become accessible in the Philippines. Before, there was just Boracay and Palawan, and for the love of God, i could never bring myself to tell people to go down south in the Philippines. I mean, man! Isn't there even a book written by one Westerner lady who was kidnapped by the insurgents down south of Philippines?

It is also in recent years only that our airport has become more welcoming to tourists (Alleluia! Now, a traveler no longer need to pay 1USD to be able to use the cart at the airport.)

If i indeed sent a farang co-worker to visit my home, I would probably have had nightmares the whole holiday time, thinking if he/she was ripped off by a taxi driver, got stranded somewhere in Makati because there was a coup being staged, or worse, that he/she got blown away by a signal number three typhoon!

Of course, i am exaggerating, but i think, you get the drift...

Oh for goodness sake, I love the Philippines! I love the fact that when somebody asks me, "Are there beaches in the Philippines?", i can haughtily retort, "Man, there are 7,107 islands in my country, how many beaches do you think we have?!"

I love the fact that it is only in the Philippines where you can find convicted criminals by the hundreds, dancing willingly to Michael Jackson's "Thriller" with gusto! (And i love the fact that it was my farang co-teacher who opened the you tube site to show me this!)

And most of all, i love the fact that every time Manny Pacquiao has a fight, the whole country stands still. (And that my idol, Mark Wahlberg, is actually a big Pacquiao fan, watches Pacquiao as he trains, and awestruck, tells reporters on television about bringing his son to see Pacquiao train! (Eat that, Adam Carolla!)

Last month, the yearly EARCOS (East Asia Regional Conferences) was held in Manila, and international school teachers from all over the region descended upon Philippines for a whole four days of learning, and beaching afterwards.

When my farang co-teachers came back to Bangkok, they were all so eager to tell us Filipinos, how beautiful our country is, and how they want to ditch their recent girlfriends for Filipinas! (I'm not sure i should agree to that one, but well, to them, they just gave my country and my fellow Filipino women, a compliment.)

Oh, of course, they complained and asked where did all the trees go in Makati, for instance ( i can't really say, "Oh, we haven't quite caught on the green craze yet. Wait a few years more, you might see more green in Manila". Either that, or we have cut down all the trees in Makiling, as well!)

And of course, they complained about the fact that it is hard to move about in Manila, transport wise. And to that, what can i say, when all i can manage to travel to and fro in Manila, is Cubao, and the length of EDSA (coz that's where Robinson's Galleria is, Mega Mall and Glorietta. Yay!)

And so, do I hate being Filipino? To this one, yes and no!
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89005

And you, don't you just hate being Filipino?
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89006

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Elektra!
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89020

This thread is simply to give voice to the many discussions, thoughts and personal experiences I have had being a Filipino (or being "Philippine", as some locals here would say).

You are all free to post your own personal views about your love-hate relationship with being Filipino.

In the meantime, I will just go on my merry way here...

'Just my thoughts, folks...

:silly:
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89025

Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino?

Sometimes yes but most of the time no....

Sometimes yes, because of those past events which a lot of people scrutinized like what Abu Sayyaf did to those Filipinos and foreigners, The massacre which just happened a couple of months ago, the corruption, snatching, kidnapping, drug trafficking, child abuse, impeachment of Erap.. blah blah blah.. These are the reason sometimes I hate to be a Filipino…

On the other hand, I’m very proud to be a Filipino. I didn’t see any immoral about being a domestic helper or a GRO. The point here is that, these people are sacrificing very hard in order for them to help their family back home. Imagine you have to do those things in order for you to help. Many of my foreign friends here in the kingdom are in the prime of their life already. And I ask them, why are you here? Most of their answer is nobody will take care of them. According to them, they appreciate life here in Asia because Asian people are so caring especially to old people. Being a Filipino is matter of a paradigm. We went out because we are running out of opportunities inside. We’re not scared of our existence. We have to do everything for the sake of our children’s future.

I’m proud to be a Filipino because Filipinos in the middle-east are the blood of the business. Filipinos in Asia are educators and they offer their services to other people which no other nationality can match their dedication. Filipinos in the western country work very hard and offer their time and effort to foster aged people which no other foreign nationality will do it.

I don’t hate being a Filipino because I do believe that Filipinos are one of the smartest people in the world, who have a beautiful tropical country and full of beautiful people.
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89034

I don't hate to be called a Filipino.
There are times that Fellow Filipinos hated to be tag as one as some of us tends to put our name in shame.

I've noticed that some Filipinos even shut their mouth once they hear another person coming talking in the same language, baka daw mapa trouble sila.

I am proud to be a Filipino wherever I am though they look small at us but it is YOU who will make you look BIG in their eyes.

Think positive in everything! You are a Filipino, because you have a purpose!

Regards to all PROUD PINOY!

Hoy! Pinoy AKO!

Bryan Luna Dela Cruz
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89036

Mr. Fitness, amen to your last line.

Bryandc, can you elaborate on what you mean with "because you have a purpose"? I only wish to understand...

:)
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Re:Don't You Just Hate Being Filipino? 4 years 5 months ago #89037

In our curriculum, one of the concepts i had to teach my first year high school students this year, is the changes that occur during pubescence/adolescence. As such, i had to touch on sensitive topics like teen pregnancy, contraception, emotional changes that take place in this period of human development, etc.

It was a mind opener to hear some girls in my class talk about the things they thought to be true about this age of life. And as a teacher and as a parent, for me it had very strong implications.

It also made me think about how i was brought up, and what kind of education (or the lack of, that is) we had at most private catholic schools in the Philippines during my high school years.

We did not have any education on what to expect when one reaches puberty, on the life changing choices we make when the time comes when we form relationships with the opposite sex, and most of all, how to put value on ourselves, our partners and on the relationship itself.

As a result, during my high school and early college years, some of my classmates who came from private catholic schools had to stop school coz they got pregnant, or they got so involved in their relationships with their boyfriends that there was no room left in their lives for studies, for a higher life purpose, for friendships, and even for family.

When Flavier's programs made the news, i thought we were finally moving towards the right track - into a time when our young girls will be given the right education, not just on how to protect themselves against unwanted pregnancies, but more towards a healthier self concept.

I believe one of the biggest problems we have as a people is our being very active on procreation. I mean, do we really all believe that we can't just enjoy the act with our life partners without resorting to actually creating more human beings?

Of course, Filipinos from the middle class and on to the higher levels of our society don't necessarily share this view, and I'll bet it's because most people who belong to these upper levels of society have access to education.

Sometimes, it would make one think, is there a conspiracy here? If indeed the government wants to cut down on our economic problems, surely, having less people to feed means better times for all, and less headaches for our government leaders? I mean, more people means less money, less resources; less resources contributes to more people going hungry; when people are hungry and they have very few jobs available or pay is so little, then they resort to crimes, drugs and other vices like alcohol and gambling.

On the other hand, if majority of voters are illiterate, hungry, and the more skilled ones are forced to go seek better lives elsewhere, then leaders are left with voters who can easily be manipulated; who would choose to survive rather than do the right thing. And when this happens, then power stays with the few elite, and such power will just easily be handed down to the next generation in their families, and to the next, and to the next.

Don't you just hate our leaders for this?

New Zealand, according to a survey i read a few weeks ago, is the most peaceful country in the world. Why is that so?

According to that article, it starts with their government officials being honest and of good integrity. As a result, people have great confidence in the government, and they pay their taxes, and in turn, there is a lot of resource for people to draw from; they have good access to health care, education and because people's needs are met, they are happy with their lives. As a result, there's very little crime, and people live in peace.

I don't believe the Philippines is poor because we do not have the advanced technology other more developed nations have. We all know we have a vast supply of resources. If the Inca people who lived more than a hundred years ago was able to build an empire where people existed in peace, was able to produce roads so well built that they are still in use today, and whose leaders were able to govern vast territories even when they did not have money nor a written language, why can we not do even just half of what these people have accomplished?

The Inca leaders knew the answer to good governance. They had a system of knowing exactly how many people lived in a certain village, how much food and resources have been stored in the storehouses, and how many people have contributed work to the empire; their form of tax.

Educated, modern, and smart as we think we are today, we are no match for what could be considered primitive people of the ancient times. We simply do not have the integrity and strength of character to build a nation upon.
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